How Our Changing World Is Affecting Our Travel

How Our Changing World Is Affecting Our Travel

Anyone who travels afar these days can’t help but wonder or worry….a little… about how our fast changing world is affecting how we travel. I know I am noticing some changes not always for the better. For me, who is in her senior years and often travelling alone, it’s becoming more of a challenge.

The rapid evolution of our technology which has had a drastic change in how we communicate has probably had the greatest impact upon how we now must travel. When I started my travelling in 2008 I did not have a cell phone or Smart phone. I did not have a computer or an E-reader. The only piece of technology I carried was my new digital camera bought the year before when I lost my Fuji camera with film while vacationing in Cuba.

Now I travel with a cell phone… which may soon have to be traded in for a Smart phone…. a tablet with and E-reader, a small laptop computer, and a camera, along with  other ‘must-haves’ such as, chargers, USP cords, adaptors and other technological gadgets designed to make my travel easier….or so I am led to believe. Frankly all these gadgets just make me more stressed. I admit I am a dinosaur when it comes to all the new technology, but I am forced to get on board with it all. If I don’t have a an app for this and that, I am often left up the  creek without a paddle. Internet cafes are fast disappearing the way of the Dodo so I can forget trying to find a place where I can get a copy of anything, such as proof of my booking at a hotel or an airline ticket. Folded paper maps that you can hold in your hands are scarcer than hens teeth. Now I am supposed to find my way around with Maps Me. A young man I met on my travels last year downloaded this app onto my tablet. I tried it out while in Viet Nam, but found it so confusing that I ended up going east instead of west for more than five kilometers before I discovered my mistake. I needed to see the whole picture of the area not just a partial one in order to get some proper orientation. I needed a map!

Today, changes in our climate are having some effect on where and when I travel. Our earth is definitely feeling the effects of global warming. Granted, we are noticing more weather extremes here in North America than the countries in SE Asia where I have been travelling to. Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Viet Nam are on or near the equator, making the effects of climate change more subtle. Nevertheless, I have noticed that the time period in Chiang Mai in the north of Thailand for comfortable weather with clear sunny days is getting shorter every year. Now we are lucky to get two months of this kind of weather before the intense heat and humidity set in. By mid February it’s getting too hot for me to stay any longer forcing me to leave for a more moderate climate. To arrive back in Nova Scotia before April is too soon since our winters are long so making a stop in one of the countries in southern Europe has helped to solve this problem. The downside to this is that it’s more expensive than any of the countries in SE Asia.

One of the many wats or temples in Bangkok.

Furthermore, it should come as no surprise that the cost of travel is creeping upward in most areas. What this means is that unless I have more money to increase my budget, I am compelled to limit my travel and opt to stay in one place. The more travelling and sight-seeing I do, the more I spend. Everyday living expenses in food and accommodations have increased over the years but not too drastically. It just takes more careful planning to keep my costs within my budget. In Thailand it’s still cheaper to eat out than it is to eat in. But, for how long? In Bangkok, the present government is cracking down on street vendors forcing them into markets or out of business entirely. This will definitely make a difference in the cost of meals for those travellers who thrived on eating authentic Thai street food at fabulous prices.

Street food in Bangkok.

Surprisingly, the cost of my airfare over and back has not increased by much, if at all, depending on when I make my bookings… the earlier the better… along with the help of a good travel agent. You can easily book a round trip fare from Halifax to Bangkok starting at $1200 and upwards depending on the class and flight times you prefer. However, if you break your flight up with short or long layovers as I do because I want to stay awhile in Europe, then you pay for the privilege. When doing this, it’s best to enlist the help of a travel agent.

Although the cost of flying hasn’t varied much, the days of leisurely air travel, which once travellers could look forward to, are fast disappearing. Most will agree that air travel is becoming more and more challenging. Increasing numbers of passengers, overwhelmed and poorly trained customer service personnel, more competition among the airlines, uncertain weather conditions, ever-changing technology, and strict security due to the threat of terrorism have all taken their toll on what used to be fun way to travel. We have all heard of the horror stories resulting from cancelled flights and missed connections. Just read the testimonials given by anyone who has experienced this, or better still talk to those you meet. Everyone has their story. I encountered all of the above when travelling westward over to Thailand with American Airlines, but since I changed my direction by heading east via Europe, I have had fewer problems. I have been lucky…so far.

Another reality…I hesitate to even mention this… is that I am not getting any younger. By eating well and remaining active, I have so far avoided having to rely on any medications, thus, eliminating the problem of carrying prescription drugs. Vitamins and other alternative health foods are available in most of the countries in SE Asia, and the ones that aren’t or are simply too expensive, I take with me. I confess I don’t get any kind of health insurance as the Thai medical system is not only inexpensive but in most cases very good. The other SE Asian countries are iffy and in some cases bad. I have accepted the fact that if I should need medical care, I will simply pay the cost because any type of medical insurance today would cost me more than the cost of my flight over and back. Taking extra caution on where I go within the countries I visit and limiting my movement by not trying to see it all, helps me keep my costs down and eliminate any possibility of getting sick or injured.

Despite the changes and challenges of travel today, it doesn’t seem to be affecting the number of people who are on the move. Tourism is up in most parts of SE Asia as it certainly is in Europe and here in North America. Many of us would agree that it’s the Chinese Effect. This huge country with its strong economy has put them on the move…young and old alike. I think it’s a good thing as it is the best way to gain an education especially for the young who will inherit the problems our world is facing. From my own experience, I count travel as one of my most valuable educators. However, now as an older traveller, I question just how it can contribute to my own personal growth.

Sunset in Laos

Supposedly with age comes wisdom gained through our long life experience, but does aging not also come with greater challenges to our capacity to be more resilient in our physical and mental abilities? If this is so, then am I not going to be affected more by the changes taking place in the world.

I can’t help pondering this dilemma after ten years of travel. The monumental changes in how we communicate, move around, and the increasing number of people travelling these days have all upped the ante to my own personal challenges. Travel was easier ten years ago. Was that because I was younger and more naive to its challenges, or was I simply that kid in the candy store exploring and savouring all the new countries and cultures I visited all the while relishing the new-found freedom that came with it? Perhaps now the time has come for me to turn my focus away from the fun and freedom of escaping our winters to concentrate on how to be of more service at home in this troubled world we find ourselves living in.

Early morning monk walk for breakfast – Luang Prebang.

Laos

 

 

Raising Sheep in Port Royal, Nova Scotia

Can you imagine being suddenly thrust into the role of parenting 80 newborn babies dependent upon you for their livelihood. Could you cope?

This spring Julia Springob and Lou Barta of Port Royal were faced with this surprise when their ewes presented them with this number of very hungry baby lambs, far more than they ever anticipated. The norm for a ewe is to birth one or maybe two lambs so imagine their surprise when many of them birthed three and even four babies. Since motherhood was new to many of their mothers, they simply couldn’t cope with so many offspring at one time. This is where Julia and Lou had to step in, resulting in bottle feedings every two hours. They were literally on call both night and day for those first weeks. Thankfully they were down to three feedings a day when I visited their farm.

I must backtrack here to explain how I got the idea to do an article on the subject of sheep farming here on my “special road”. If I leave my house to go anywhere further than walking distance, I must get into my car to travel to our nearest town of Annapolis Royal or any other place in Nova Scotia. This amounts to at least several times a week. If you take a look at my post entitled My Road Well Travelled, (click here) you can find more information on what makes this road so special, not just to me, but many others who live and visit here. Each time I travel this road I pass Julia and Lou’s sheep farm, and every time I can’t resist taking a peek at those little lambs…plus several goats… to see just how quickly they are growing. It’s a heart-warming sight.

I became so intrigued with the idea of finding out more about the owners and their sheep that I made an appointment to interview them, resulting in a piece I had published in the Valley Harvester, our local community newspaper. This is what I found out about raising sheep in Nova Scotia.

After taking me on a tour of their farm to meet the baby lambs, witness their bottle feeding, as well as to meet the goats and the sheep dogs, I quickly realized that this idyllic farm is being built with an abundance of hard work and dedication.

Just feed me.

At last. Thanks papa Lou.

Sheep farming in Nova Scotia is a challenging business requiring lots of know-how and cash. A lover of lamb meat, I have always wondered why it isn’t so readily available in our grocery stores and is more expensive than beef or pork. Well, now I think I understand why.

Julia and Lou have been at this for a year now having moved here from British Columbia where they farmed on a part-time basis for 16 years. They decided to immigrate to Canada in 2000 from Germany. Julia’s native country is Germany and Lou hails from what was once Czechoslovakia. Their B.C. farm was located in the northern, interior part of B.C. in the Bulkley Valley halfway between Prince Rupert and Prince George. There, Lou drove a logging truck while Julia stayed home to raise chickens, turkeys, some beef cows. She also maintained a large vegetable garden providing food for themselves  and their neighbours. Lou’s yearning to be his own boss and their growing desire to go into full-time farming compelled them to take the plunge and begin their search for more land. With land prices in B.C. escalating, they turned their eyes eastward and with the help of the Internet settled on a picturesque farm in Port Royal.

In their first year, they have increased their flock of sheep from 45 to 60, not counting the newborn babies. In addition, they have seven goats, three guard dogs, and one herd dog, still just a kid being diligently trained to take on his adult duties in the near future. I think it’s a miracle they all survived their trip east and their first winter. Now in their middle years, Lou proudly announced, “We haven’t lost a single animal to any disease, climate or predators. We have an electric fence and our guard dogs to thank for this.” I would add that he needs to give credit to himself and Julia.

When asked what their greatest challenge has been so far, they both agreed it was the task of transporting the animals in two large trailers driven by Lou and a friend followed by a back trailer driven by Julia from B.C. to N.S. in just seven days

“It was the most arduous task we have ever had to take on” said Julia. “The weather was heating up in June, making it difficult to keep the animals cool. We were worried about finding places where we could stop for the night and not be an annoyance to the folks around us. Our animals would always make too much noise around feeding time.”

However it turned out that most people, when they heard what they doing, were more than happy to lend a hand in providing a place to park their vehicles with enough water for the hot, thirsty animals.

As Julia pointed out, there was one other high point during their trip which presented itself once they got here… the birth of a baby lamb in November!

As for how they feel after their first year in Nova Scotia and whether they are optimistic about their future here as sheep farmers, their reply was passionate in their quest to raise healthy and affordable food for local eating. Eventually they hope to provide their products to the community as they did in B.C. by starting small and relying on word of mouth. They see a future in this province for the small farmer who wants to join the ever-growing need to become more sustainable in food production. However, Lou did seem concerned about the government and parents not doing enough to encourage young people to climb aboard to take up small farming.

When asked what joy they get from their new venture, without hesitation they said:

  • You can be your own boss.
  • You know where your food is coming from and what’s in it. I must add that they are living proof of this as both who are in their 50’s and look the picture of health.
  • You never can be bored with your work. Every day is different.
  • The challenges you meet present new learning through personal experience.
  • You can be outside as much as you want and have access to clean water and air.

For now they want to continue expanding their flock of sheep to the point where they can support themselves as well as their community. They also want to meet the standards as set by the province for producing healthy food products, which will mean obtaining all the necessary licences. Julia loves to make goat cheese, and she’s even thinking of the possibility of lamb pies and sausages.

However, in order to accomplish that she knows she will have to upgrade her huge kitchen to meet those food production regulations. Right now they are taking it all one day at a time, concentrating on increasing their flock to a sustainable level, and ensuring their lambs and goats are kept safe and healthy.

Julia, Lou, and herd dog.